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Arboretum Waterway

Student Leaders: Noreen Mabini

Tue, May 19, 2020

Thanks to her experiences working at the Arboretum and Public Garden, Noreen Mabini is well on her way to achieving her career aspirations of becoming a restoration specialist. As a co-coordinator for the Learning by Leading Waterway Stewardship team, the third-year UC Davis student oversees 10 undergraduate interns whose work includes renewing, maintaining, and restoring the Arboretum Waterway. 

Common carp could be cause of common problem in Arboretum Waterway

Fri, February 21, 2020
Carp Research in the Arboretum Waterway

Undergraduate researcher Kim Luke with the Center for Watershed Sciences is working with the Arboretum and Public Garden to conduct an experiment about how different fishes in the Arboretum Waterway may influence water quality. She is particularly interested in how one kind of fish, common carp, influence algal blooms.

Arboretum Waterway Improved with Tule Transplants

Tue, February 04, 2020

Tule (Schoenoplectus acutus) offers wildlife habitat for birds and other animals, prevents erosion and adds to the aesthetic appeal of the landscape along the Arboretum Waterway. 

Wild Grapes in the West-end

Wed, November 20, 2019
Grape work! The barren banks on the west-end of the Arboretum Waterway are now home to wild grape cuttings, thanks to the Waterway Stewardship team.

Cyanobacteria Detected in Arboretum Waterway

Tue, August 27, 2019
Tests show that cyanobacteria are growing in parts of the Arboretum Waterway. These microscopic organisms can make a toxin that is rapidly lethal to dogs that ingest contaminated water.

Cyanobacteria FAQ

Cyanobacteria FAQ

During the Summer of 2019, we tested for and found that cyanobacteria exists in the Arboretum Waterway. Commonly found in bodies of water throughout our state, nation and world, cyanobacteria usually occur in calm, nutrient-rich bodies of water. Below are some FAQs related to the recent discovery.