Drought

Training your roses to be more drought tolerant

May 14, 2015
Taylor Lewis, nursery manager for the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden, suggests that it is possible to train your roses to be more drought tolerant. His experience with roses and similar types of perennials and shrubs is that taking the time to keep them pruned back during their first summer pays dividends in water savings in the long term.

Drought underscores importance of native plants

May 13, 2015
Ellen Zagory, director of public horticulture for the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden, is featured in Davis Enterprise article dated May 13, 2015, Drought underscores the importance of native plants.

5 steps for establishing drought-tolerant plants

January 12, 2015
Plants are curious creatures. Unlike us, they cannot get up and get a drink of water when they are parched. By nature, they are rooted to the spot and rely on Mother Nature or a nearby gardener to supply water. Here are five tips for establishing new plants to make your garden truly drought tolerant:

Self-guided walking tour of native plant landscapes

November 05, 2014
On September 18, 2014 we hosted a 1-day “Convert Your Water-Hungry Lawn to a Drought-tolerant Landscape” workshop sponsored by the California Native Grassland Association. Participants received in-depth information for converting high-water-use conventional lawns into beautiful low-water-use, attractive, native, and climate-appropriate landscapes.

IN THE NEWS: Feature on UC Davis drought website

May 20, 2014
The Arboretum and Public Garden was featured in May on the home page “Spotlight” of the UC Davis California Drought Watch website (shown above as it appeared in spring).

7 tips for landscape survival during drought

January 22, 2014
With water reserves at all-time lows, water rates reaching all-time highs, and severe water rationing on the horizon, representatives from the staff at the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden compiled some quick tips for homeowners whose goal is to save water as well as their landscapes.